Ask and Ye Shall Receive…More Gender-fair Options

LandsEndScienceToday’s post is semi-old news but the message is the same: if you want gender-fair options, ask for them. That’s exactly what one mom did with Lands’ End when she noted the t-shirt options for boys and girls were highly gendered. Lands’ End actually responded by expanding their offerings!

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Back To School! Part 2, Backpack Drives

This week we’re re-posting a popular back-to-school series from last year. Tuesday we tackled back to school shopping. We hope that has been going well, and you were able to stick to your End Goal. A reader posted a most insightful comment on that post about the importance of being gender fair when shopping for backpack drives, so we’re dedicating this week to discussing backpack drives. You may recall our focus on family-oriented community service around Thanksgiving and gosh darn it, it’s about time we had another post about service.

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Back to School! Shopping for Supplies Safely

Backpacks are one back-to-school item often best purchased online where variety is greater

Somehow it is that time of year again – back to school! This week we’re re-posting a popular, two-part series we did during back to school time last year. Today we’ll talk about back to school shopping. Thursday we’ll talk about backpack drives.

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We’ve been Dissertating — From Europe!

CoyleBerlinJuly14I promise we’re returning to our regularly scheduled programming shortly. I’ve got SO many exciting things to share with you all — more book reviews (summer reading kick…), more information about LEGO’s new female scientist mini figs, and end-of-summer fun. I’ve been away presenting my dissertation at a conference in Germany and then vacationing a bit. I’m back now and continuing to work with families and collect data. I’ll have more serious conclusions to share soon! In the meantime, check out some of my favorite posts from summers past:

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Book Review: Ordinary People Change the World series

JackieRobinsonOne of the aspects of NPR listenership that many stations tend to target in the semi-annual pledge drives is the concept of “driveway moments”: sitting in your car after you’ve arrived home in order to hear the end of a story before going into your home. The idea is that if you experience these moments a lot (I do), you must value their service and enjoy their stories, and you should support them with a donation (don’t worry, I also do that too). I had one such driveway moment last week during an interview with Brad Meltzer on the program Here & Now about his children’s book series, Ordinary People Change the World.

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Kid Crafts: Rainbow Loom

RainbowLoomBoxWe apologize for the long hiatus since our last post — we’ve been running our dissertation experiment! It’s still ongoing, but so far we’ve learned all kinds of cool stuff about gender, spatial and mechanical learning, and child development. We’ll post an update about preliminary findings when we have something more official to say. In the meantime, today’s post is about one preliminary finding unrelated to the focus of the experiment: young children LOVE Rainbow Loom.

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Getting Reel, Book Review combo: Divergent

DivergentCoverOn Wednesdays, we get together with some grad student friends for happy hour (the early bird special might be a more accurate description). We are all in psychology but from a mix of sub-disciplines, years, and life experiences. Lest I get sappy here, suffice it to say, Wednesdays are a blend of friendship and mentoring among some pretty darn educated, wonderful women. We talk about gender a lot — because it’s a personal interest of all of ours, because it’s my research area, and because we are women in science. Last week we moved our discussion to the movie theater. I used my most endearing/forceful tactics to get us to see Divergent.

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We’ve been Dissertating!

CoyleGradExhibition_6April2014Back to our regular schedule next week — I’ve been busy lately with grad school and my dissertation. This weekend I got to present some preliminary elements of my dissertation in a local research exhibition. I actually won an award for it, so that was kind of cool. More importantly, I had the delightful opportunity to talk to families, parents, grandparents, and all kinds of interesting people about the exciting research I’m doing in gender and early STEM learning. It is interactions like these that fuel my passion for research in early gender and STEM, and for connecting that research with families and educators. THANK YOU all for being the source of these interactions as well!

Gift Guide: Child-Safe Archery Options

GenesisBowYesterday on our Facebook we linked to a New York Times article about the push for “girls’” archery options. With more and more books and movies prominently featuring strong, female leads with mad archery skills, it’s no surprise. We’re thrilled that this is something for which girls and boys are clamoring. But, if you read the NYT piece, you also know that “girls’” options are just what the Pink Aisle has led you to expect: pink, sparkly, and stereotyped. Today we’re covering some gender-fair options instead.

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The Trouble with Barbie, and Enter: Barbie 2.0

Lammily1You may have heard, there is a new Barbie on the block. Or rather, an “average” fashion doll called Lammily. As Fair Play colleague Lacey wrote us recently, “um, Lammily –  Lacey + Emily?!!”

Genius. Someone must have read both of our (gender-related developmental psychology) work and invented the doll we’ve been dreaming about. We’ve been scooped! …kidding, mostly.

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